Archives for May 2016

Rating of NEMA versus IP Boxes

There is often confusion about the various rating systems for the protection of equipment within an enclosure. We are often asked which system is best and how are they different? If the customer is in the US, are they better off buying NEMA boxes or one with an IP rating, or does it even matter? While there are no hard and fast answers to the question of which is best, we thought it might be helpful to provide a few details to help the customer navigate these systems.

IP, or ingress protection marking, is the International standard, typically used throughout the world and only recently gaining adherents in the US.  It is based on the IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission) standard 60529.  NEMA ratings were established by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association and take a somewhat different approach to designating protection levels than does the IP system. While there can be self-testing (and these are typically noted by phrases such as “designed to meet IPXX”), there are regulatory agencies such as UL for NEMA and TUV for IP that will perform and certify the tests for the various levels of protection. While there are charts that purport to show the relationship between and IP rating and a NEMA rating, the differences can be subtle yet important.

An IP ratings typically is a two digit number. The first digit stands for the level of solid particle protection while the second digit represents the level of liquid ingress protection. The levels for the solid particles range from 0 for no protection to 6 which is dust tight.  The second digit ranges from 0 (no protection) to 9.

The NEMA system uses one number to represent the level of protection although confusingly the higher the number does not necessarily represent increased security but rather different types of water resistance.

The other difference is that the tests performed to certify the ratings might be quite different although they produce a similar level of protection. For example, the spray test on a NEMA 4 box is 65 GPM of water from a 1 inch nozzle delivered from at least 10 feet away for 5 minutes. Some may suggest that NEMA 4 is the same as IP66, but the IP66 test is for 3 minutes instead of 5, 3 meters instead of 10 feet and with a slightly different sized nozzle. Although close, they are not the identical.

Below are the charts with a brief explanation of the protection levels and testing process. used to rate IP Boxes and NEMA Boxes.  As always, if you have any questions, never hesitate to contact the enclosure manufacturer for exact details and certifications.

IP protection explained.

number 1

2nd a

2nd b

2nd c

2nd d

NEMA ratings.

nema a

nema b

Let’s take a look at a NEMA 4 enclosure from our YouTube channel.

With so many box sizes available please contact Sales@Discount-Low-Voltage.com for a detailed quote.

Cabling to go through a Drop Ceiling?

Routing low voltage wiring through suspended ceiling installations is no longer a problem. The CTS cable penetration system organizes your cable wires and is easy to install while leaving a clean look.

Let’s take a look at this system from our YouTube channel.

Here’s an example of a common why to do it, as you can tell it does not look as clean.

cable-sleeve-bad

Now if you use the cable entrance plate and you dress the cables nice and straight now that’s how you do it. To order this online visit Discount-Low-Voltage.com

 

Building Entrance Telephone Lightning Protection

Before we dive into the Circa product let’s talk about why you need protection. The National Electric Code Article 800, and the Canadian Electric Code Section 60, Subsection 200 and 202, requires the use of surge protection for telephone lines. Today’s sensitive telecommunications equipment requires more protection than ever to safeguard it against damage caused by lightning or electrical surges. Circa Building Entrance Terminals help to protect your equipment investment with sizes and features that adapt to your special needs. Daily fluctuations in current can wear down, and eventually destroy, fragile circuitry before its time.

How is this protection used? Circa’s protectors are designed for flexibility that assures a perfect fit for your business, residential and campus applications. We offer a variety of capacity options (1, 2 , 6, 10, 12 , 25, 50, 100, 200 and 300 pair sizes) that can be deployed in multiples for high pair count applications. Circa Building Entrance Terminals (BET’s) are both rack and wall-mountable. Input/output options include 110 connectors, 66 blocks, BIX connectors, swivel stubs, RJ21X connectors and pre-connected MS2 or 710 connectors. Remember to install a suitable protector on both ends of every exposed line leading into your telecommunications and networking equipment, whether aerial or buried. Proper grounding is essential for rated performance of protection circuitry.

Let’s take a look at some of the different size blocks and fuses that go along with them from our YouTube channel.

These are just a few examples of Circa’s offerings. You can order these or if you have a Circa part number that is not on the site contact us and order online.

 

How to set up remote access for ECORHD

Here’s a great look at how to set up remote access for the Everfocus ECORHD digital video recorder.

Easy, now your ready to take your new system to the next level.

Running Fiber to the Antenna?

Recently I was on a call with a customer and he ordered some fiber optic cable for a FTTA installation. So I did some digging around about what else in involved and how are these cables installed. I found a decent video regarding an installation like this.

The large reel with the power cable included was interesting. I decided to make a couple of phone calls to manufactures and seem like right now that type of cable is only offered and sold to the cell tower companies.

The cable my customer purchased was a indoor outdoor pre-made cable, and it was only to replace the coax cables. There was no need to touch power since power was already ran for existing equipment. Here’s a look at some of our other pre-terminated fiber optic cable options.

I wonder how much they get at the recycling yard for those coax cables.

HD over coax, goodbye IP cameras?

For what seemed like forever, people always drifted to IP for the HD image but it was very costly for home or small business installations.

Now you get HD image quality over traditional coax cable at the analog camera price! Let’s check out a webinar by Bolide CCTV who now have an excellent offering of HD analog security products.

You can now get a High Definition Security System without the IP system price.

How to Clean Fusion Splicer V-Groove

Today’s splicing equipment is fast, efficient, and requires minimal maintenance due to advances in splicing technology. However, contamination in the v-groove of the splicer is still a primary source of trouble for the splicing technician. This is especially problematic when splicing with a fixed v-groove fusion splicer. Environmental contamination, such as dust, dirt, and fiber coating debris, as well as, the silica deposits generated during the fusion process eventually find their way to the surface of the v-groove. This contamination will offset the fibers and degrade performance. To help control this problem, a disciplined cleaning regimen and specific tooling is required to ensure the splice is right the first time. To solve cleaning needs, AFL offers the Splicer V-Groove Cleaning Kit. This product integrates eight components into an affordable and effective inspection and cleaning solution for any fusion splicer. Small and lightweight, it fits easily into the Fujikura splicer transit case or it can be carried separately in its own carrying case.

Here’s a great look at how to clean your V-Groove for your Fusion Splicer.

Kit Includes

  • Scrubber Brush with stiff tapered nylon bristles
  • Sweeper Brush with soft nylon bristles
  • Eye Loupe with 3X to 12X magnification
  • LED Pen Light with momentary or constant on switching
  • Cleaning Fluid that is nonflammable and environmentally safe
  • Lint-free Cotton Swabs
  • Instruction Sheet with illustrations
  • Canvas Carrying Case

Order this kit online at Discount-Low-Voltage.com

 

 

LC connector instructions for 2 or 3mm Zip patch jumper cable

Here’s a great video on how to put the AFL fiber connector on a 2 or 3mm jacketed 2 strand zip fiber cable.

You can order the LC connectors, right size boots and LC clip online at Discount-Low-Voltage.com

Biometric Access Control and Time Attendance Reader

Identify or verify users by their face, fingerprint, proximity card or PIN/Password…. or any combination, all conveniently from a single device. Built-in Infrared light source enables operation in dimly lit rooms. The Multibio 700 works without a computer. Complete setup and programming can be done via keypads and embedded firmware. Stunning 3in color TFT touch screen provides ease of use and rich user experience with intuitive and user friendly GUI. Includes both voice and visual prompts which indicate the acceptance or rejection of fingerprint, Can store up to 400 faces, 5000 fingerprints, 20000 card holders and 100,000 transactions. The data can be backed up to a USB flash drive and can also be transferred to another reader in the absence of computer connectivity. Relay Outputs for electric lock visitor bell and alarm. Inputs for door status sensor and exit switch. Supports multiple timezones and personnel groups for programming valid entry zones. The Alarm will be triggered when the tamper switch is activated. Internal Proximity Card or Mifare Card reader allows triple factor authentication for access control.

Let’s check out an overview from our buddy Eli the computer guy.

This is a great unit for companies that want more security and piece of mind and it ain’t even that expensive! To order the Multibio 700 visit Discount-Low-Voltage.com

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