OM5 Fiber Optic Cable? Are you for real?

It was previously known as the Wide Band Multimode Fiber or (WB MMF). After a heated argument on what the standard would be, the Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) has finalized a standard. OM5 is a version of OM4 fiber optic cable with additional bandwidth characterization at 953nm.

TIA worked on the WB MMF standard and made it support short wavelength division multiplexing (SWDM) transmission. The TIA standard is TIA-492AAAE. The mechanical and optical attributes are compliant with OM4 specs but also include additional specifications of effective modal bandwidth and attenuation at 953 nm. WB MMF is intended for operation using vertical-cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) transceivers across the 846 to 953 nm wavelength range.

Short wavelength division multiplexing (SWDM) technology uses four wavelengths across the 850 to 940 nm range. SWDM transceivers were designed to use two strands of fiber connectivity into transceivers with OM3/OM4. The SWDM VCSEL transceivers are now commercialized beginning throughout 2017. See figure 1.

 

Mux to Demux example

4x25GbE/Wavelength 2 fiber SWDM

 

You may be asking yourself if SWDM is used over OM5. SMDW transceivers are compatible with OM3/OM4/OM5 and OM5 also pushes the data rates even further.

The specified modal bandwidth (EMB) values for OM5 are…

EMB > 4700 MHz – km at 850 nm

EMB > 2470 MHz – km at 953 nm

EMB for OM3/OM4 are only specified at 850 as with OM5 is specified for both 850 and 953nm.

The EMB of OM5 is lower at 953 nm by using a combination of low chromatic dispersion and high EMB. The ideal zero dispersion wavelength occurs at 1310 nm. 953 nm is closer to 1310 nm chromatic dispersion is lower, and consequently, the EMB requirement is lower and achieves the same system performance.

Currently, there is no specified optical transmission standard for OM5. Transmission standards typically include only one multimode fiber variant and that’s selected based on economic, commercial, and equipment criteria.

TIA specifies the new color jacket for OM5 as Green. No new polarity methods are specified, and traditional Corning universal will still be commonly used. Field loss measurements will not be required for both 850 and 953 um.

Hopefully, this has helped to bring you up to speed with one of the many happenings in the fiber optic market. For pricing and availability on OM5 contact Discount-Low-Voltage.com

A Floating Fiber Optic Network?

The United States Navy relies upon satellite and other communications systems to make sure ships, planes, and sailors can share information across the Seven Seas. In peacetime, those systems are a given. But what happens in wartime, when satillites are shot down and other forms of comms are jammed or otherwise disrupted?

That’s a very good question. The United States, NATO, and other key allies rely to a tremendous extent on satellite communications—which makes those satellites target No. 1 in a future war.

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is developing a solution: TUNA. TUNA stands for Tactical Underwater Network Architecture, a portable, temporary communications network made up of floating communications buoys linked by fiber optic cable.

Here’s how it would work. In the event of communications failure over a broad area, aircraft and ships would unload a series of TUNA buoys at sea. Each buoy consists of a radio frequency transmitter and power system. The buoys are connected by a “hair-thin, buoyant” fiber optic cable that can carry a tremendous amount of data and survive the harshness of the open ocean for at least thirty days—hopefully enough time to get primary communications restored.

Think of the system as laying a series of telephone poles across the surface of the ocean, a secure, hardwired system impossible to jam. While an adversary could theoretically tap the fiber optic lines and listen in, looking for a hair-thin wire in the middle of the Pacific Ocean would be even harder than looking for a needle in a haystack.

Fiber optic cable, military installation

    Example of fiber optic cable used in underwater military applications.

Individual buoys will likely be powered by WEBS, or Wave Energy Buoy that Self-Deploys. WEBS generates electricity from wave energy and consists of two floats that sit on the surface of the water and are rotated by passing waves. Differential and rotary motion is transferred through gearboxes to electrical generators, providing power.

The TUNA system is entering its final phase of development and is using the Pentagon’s Link 16 as a test subject. Link 16 is a secure digital communications network used by U.S. forces for text, digital imagery and digital voice transmission and reception.

No word on when TUNA will be ready for duty, but it sounds like all of the major engineering milestones have already been achieved.

This was a cool read so I thought I’d share it with you. For the complete article visit Popular Mechanics.

Need Fiber for Security Cameras?

Fiber Optic Media Converters like the Signamax 065-1196A series, are the economical bridge between a copper infrastructure and an optical fiber run.  Even in smaller security networks the obstacle to reach distances greater than 100 meters will require an extension over fiber.
Fiber Camera Layout
Imagine a property with a copper-based network that has decided to increase their security parameters by installing additional cameras.  The additional coverage could be around the parking lot, a multi-story building, or maybe the property has multiple structures that will require extended data transmissions.  Once the copper-base recommended distance is breached between the cameras and the network video recorder, the transmission will typically work intermittently or not at all. To ensure the investment meets its intentions a span of optical fiber with the existing copper-base will allow a more reliable transmission for the extended span by decreasing the electromagnetic interference between the cameras and the NVR.
For more information regarding the Media Converter, PoE Switch visit Discount-Low-Voltage.com

Need to string Fiber Optic Cable pole to pole?

If you looking to install fiber optic cable aerially from pole to pole this can be a very labor intensive installation.

adss installation

Let’s get a good look at the ADSS cable via the AFL YouTube channel.

Now that was some great information on the ADSS Cable that AFL provided but let’s get a closer look at as 12 strand singlemode cable from the Discount-Low-Voltage.com YouTube channel.

The fact that your considering going with the ADSS cable is a fantastic option compared to a figure-8 fiber cable. This cable is a lot lighter making the shipping cost much better and the labor is a lot easier when you have to move the reel around and when you have to pull and install the cable up on that pole. We also have this cable in a preterminated option, maybe your installation is on the farm and you need to get a signal to the barn.

For more information, click on the downloads tab for spec sheets and you can also order per foot online at Discount-Low-Voltage.com

Fiber to the Desktop

AFL’s “Fiber-In-A-Box” solution offers contractors lightweight, easy to use cable packaging with “out of the box” disbursement of fiber cable. No reel supports or pay-off’s are required. Simply set the box down in a convenient place, unlock the built-in braking mechanism and begin pulling. Adjust the braking mechanism to apply the amount of pulling tension required. Stack and configure boxes together to disburse cable from several reels at the same time. this unique cable package solution will save contractors valuable time and cost.

Simplex fiber optic cables provide the strength and flexibility required for today’s fiber interconnect applications. AFL offers the broadest selection of simplex cordage including Plenum, Riser and LSZH, available in all diameters. Our simplex cable is tested to meet Telcordia GR-326 when used in connectorized assemblies. AFL provides customized performance with regard to jacket stiffness and flexibility, diameter, print legend, jacket color and tight buffer strippability. The easy strip option allows removal of up to one meter of 900 μm material without stripping the fiber’s 250 μm coating. Compliant with Directive 2002/95/EC (RoHS).

Okay, let’s take a look at this fiber optic cable from our YouTube Channel.

Let’s go over the features that maybe were not mentioned in the video.

  • Easy count printing – descending marks (feet or meters) indicating amount of cable remaining on reel
  • Light weight and easy to transport with grips on both sides of the box for easy handling
  • Eliminates the need for reel supports and cable spooling equipment
  • Unique braking mechanism allows reel to be locked in place within carton during transport and provides control of tension during cable pulls
  • Boxes can be stacked and configured to support easy pay-off of multiple cable runs
  • Wording under feed-through slot reminds installers of proper pulling methods for optical cable
  • Factory packaging ensures cable is not “over-stressed” in non-factory cable cutting operations where personnel may not be sensitive to proper handling of fiber optic cable
  • Available in lengths of 1000, 2000 and 3000 feet, depending on cable diameter
  • Easy access to reel from top allows installers to repackage excess cable removed from box
  • Easy way to organize, store and manage short lengths of excess cable

If your looking to get a connection for that one piece of equipment and you do it often due to adds, moves and changes this might be a perfect fit for your application. Order online at Discount Low Voltage.com

 

Running Fiber to the Antenna?

Recently I was on a call with a customer and he ordered some fiber optic cable for a FTTA installation. So I did some digging around about what else in involved and how are these cables installed. I found a decent video regarding an installation like this.

The large reel with the power cable included was interesting. I decided to make a couple of phone calls to manufactures and seem like right now that type of cable is only offered and sold to the cell tower companies.

The cable my customer purchased was a indoor outdoor pre-made cable, and it was only to replace the coax cables. There was no need to touch power since power was already ran for existing equipment. Here’s a look at some of our other pre-terminated fiber optic cable options.

I wonder how much they get at the recycling yard for those coax cables.

250um color buffer vs. 900um color buffer

If you’re new to fiber optic cable one of the things you have noticed when looking at different cables, some have a 250um buffer and others have a 900um buffer. How do they look different? Here’s a great video from our YouTube channel.

https://youtu.be/CSbGTgKn46A

Best Practice of Safe Disposal of Fibers

While splicing or terminating optical fibers, pieces of fiber are cleaved off or can break off in the stripping process. This glass is very small, sometimes nearly microscopic. It is difficult to find, harder to remove and can get stuck in clothing, onto hands, and into the skin. If they were to end up in your lunch, they could lead to internal bleeding and conceivably death. The fiber technician not only has the responsibility for his or her own safety, but for the safety of others who may come in contact with this fiber.

fiber tech

Fiber scraps should never be thrown on the ground, on a floor, or openly placed in wastebaskets. Fiber debris should be confined in a special container or bagged in a zipper storage bag, sealed and then placed into a trash bin separate from those handled by the office cleaning staff.

Broadcast Fiber Optic Cable? What’s up with that?

If your looking for a fiber optic cable for a highly congested people application and you’re worried about damage to the cable look no further. Let’s check out a cable by AFL.

Let’s go over some of the applications for this type of fiber optic cable.

– Field deployment in abusive environments

– High traffic areas

– Security and sensing applications

– Broadcast deployments

– Installations in harsh environments

– Sporting and media events

– Temporary installation of of critical lines where quick retrieval and re-use is necessary

So if your looking for a fiber optic cable that is ideal for use in installations where extreme environmental conditions are present, something designed to be deployed and retrieved in the field, a cable that is highly resistant to damage caused by repetitive impact of harsh conditions this broadcast fiber cable is what you’ve been waiting a lifetime for.

On a separate note, if your in the broadcasting industry you should probably watch is video. It’s at a February SMPTE meeting with Jerome Farnan, the director of fiber optics with Winchester Electronics giving a presentation on fiber optic link reliability.

Questions on Broadcasting Fiber contact Mercy Salinas EX232 888-797-3697

Total Internal Reflection in Fiber Optic Cable Explained

This is a great explanation, very simple and easy to understand.

If you’re looking for more cool videos on fiber check out our YouTube channel.