Let’s do a burn test on Counterfeit Category Cable

It seems like since around the early 2000s we’ve heard stories of low end cable manufactures cutting corners such as copper clad aluminum and pushing it as a 100% copper conductor and I’ll also never forget the phone call I received from a contractor yelling at me about how hundreds of his Cat5e jacks are failing (He bought the jacks from me, these ones) and after further inspection the cable he installed (Not bought from me) was actually a 26awg not a 24awg as stated by that cable manufacture and it caused all kinds of contact issues.

Now I have something new to reference bad cables with, the Communications Cable and Connectivity Association did a video demonstrating a burn test on counterfeit cables. This videos does a great job not only demonstrating what happens but also referencing standards from TIA and fire codes from the NFPA, let’s check out this video.

It’s interesting how the counterfeit cables do act like a fuse and the spread of the fire and smoke was amazing. Remember smoke inhalation is the number one cause of death in fires. The video does talk about the UL holographic logo you should look for but that’s another thing I’ve already seen that’s also been counterfeited so you may want to look for that but also make sure you purchase your copper cable from a reputable manufacture and be-careful with the “House Brand” of cable.

OTDR, What does it do?

Optical Time Domain Reflectometers (OTDRs) and fault locators are used to certify new fiber installations and locate faults in deployed fiber optic networks.

OTDR

OTDRs:

  • Scan and characterize fiber optic networks (from one end of the fiber).
  • Display characterized fiber either as a trace showing optical loss and reflectance vs. distance or as a LinkMap providing an icon-based representation of the fiber sections, splices, connectors and any detected faults (breaks or macro-bends).
  • Provide link summary information (end-to-end length, loss, optical return loss).
  • Provide details for each detected connector, splice or fault including event location, event type, loss and reflectance at event and loss to event.

Let’s get a good look at one of the AFL models from their YouTube channel.

OTDRs and fault locators are available for both multi-mode and single-mode networks including passive optical networks (PONs) supporting a range of performance requirements and budgets.

For more information on selecting the proper OTDR check out the AFL selection guide. Once you have a model selected contact your Authorized AFL Distributor Discount-Low-Voltage.com for pricing and availability.

Use your smart phone to help test Fiber Optic Cable

Two things are happening in the world that have a significant impact on fiber testing—more than 6 billion smartphone users are expected in the next four years and 400 gigabit per second (Gb/s) data center speeds are expected in the next two years.

The two are clearly related because more devices mean more data and the need for higher bandwidth, resulting in an ever increasing number of fiber links in the data center. But how exactly are they related when it comes to testing those links?

As the most widely used interface, it makes complete sense for your smartphone to become an integral part of an overall fiber testing and inspection solution. It’s rapidly becoming a “must have” rather than a “nice to have.” Leveraging your smartphone can make the task of testing fiber links easier, faster and more efficient—and that means more money in your pocket.

the rouge tester

When it comes to using your smartphone for testing, it’s important to have a good app. A powerful and flexible app that is also uncomplicated can go a long way in minimizing testing challenges without the need for additional training. The right combination of a great app and an advanced fiber test platform offers a myriad benefits. You can easily see your assigned testing project and parameters, view and save live test data as it is collected, and recall and share results via email, text or mobile cloud applications. And by syncing results data to the cloud, you no longer have to save it to a USB drive and risk the chance of lost test data or managers waiting for the information.

As fiber technology continues to evolve and network speeds continue to increase to 40 and 100 gigabit and beyond, fiber optic networks are becoming more sophisticated and more complex than ever before. And that means more stringent performance requirements and greater pressure to ensure proper design and installation. While test and inspection may be a small part of your business, it is essential for ensuring that your fiber optic installation will meet the performance requirements for the application it was intended to support.

Let’s check out the product video from AFL.

At a time when extensive and comprehensive fiber testing is a must, doesn’t it make sense to use a device that you already own and are comfortable using—especially if it helps you get the job done faster and more efficiently to save you time and money?

You can order online at Discount-Low-Voltage.com

 

How to test the attenuation of Fiber Optic Cable

I got tired of all the wizards and scientist over explaining every detail when it comes to testing fiber, so I grabbed a light source and power meter out of inventory and made a fiber link with a couple of wall mount boxes so I can easily show you how to do it.

Here’s some words from the manufacture regarding this fiber test kit – The Silicon ZOOM II / Dual OWL 850 Test Kit is ideal for LAN managers and installers who need to do simple attenuation tests on their multimode networks.

The Silicon ZOOM II (Zeroed Output Optical Meter) is an economical fiber optic power meter designed to provide accurate testing of multimode fiber cables at 850nm wavelength. The 4-digit 7-segment LCD display shows power readings with a resolution of 0.01dB, power units in dBm, dB, or uW, and battery power level. The Silicon ZOOM II comes configured with a 2.5mm universal port for connection to SC, ST, and other connector types that have a 2.5mm ferrule.

These are in stock, order it online at Discount-Low-Voltage.com

Why and How to wire a home, cable testing – part SIX

Part 6 of the Residential Network Cabling series will focus on UTP type cable and what to think about when installing the Cat 5e Cat 6 and Cat6A cables. Let’s check it out.

I noticed one of the testers not shown is the VDVPro. This is one of the most preferred testers for the installation contractors. If you have time you might want to check out the overview video so you can fully unlock the potential of this tester.

To order the VDVPro visit Discount Low Voltage.